Thin Mints and Business Hints

The Simple Brilliance Behind Girl Scout Marketing Practices

By Brittany Robinett

The year of 2014 has ushered in several stories about successful Girl Scouts members who have rightfully earned their “cookie business” badge, as several made headlines for selling an abundance of America’s favorite cookies.

Most of us are familiar with the hilarious story that came out this February about a young scout from California who ingeniously set up shop in front of a medical marijuana clinic. Within a mere two hours, she managed to sell over 100 boxes of cookies. (This, of course, was not well-received by many chapters, who found it inappropriate for its members to sell in front of adult establishments.) Then, this March, we heard about an Oklahoma City scout who broke the all-time cookie sells record, selling up to 18,107 boxes within a seven-week period. How did she reach this record? According to her, she simply asked every person that she met to buy a box.

Thin MintIt’s interesting to contemplate how much media attention the organization’s cookie sales receive. What enables these young girls, ranging from ages of 5 to 17, to influence their communities enough to create and maintain what has grown into a $700 million empire? (Given, our taste buds have all been captured by the spiritual experience that is a Do-si-do.) There must be some common sense principles at work that businesses of all sizes can take note of and employ.

Along with leadership skills and community involvement, the organization aims to instill entrepreneurial skills into its members. What seems to impress the media the most, however, is the outgoing marketing strategy that the girls learn to employ. At the end of the day, the Girl Scouts is not a business – it’s a youth organization that operates at a national level. However, although a national organization, cookies must be sold and bought locally from a Girl Scout. Perhaps this focus on a national brand at a local level shows just how important it is for customers to attach people to a brand.

The Girl Scout’s online marketing materials cite the number of facts that the girls are advised to consider during the selling season. Summed up, each of these points encourages the girls to sell their cookies with four customer-based principles in mind:

  • Customer outreach
  • Customer loyalty
  • Customer interest

Why do you see local scouts selling outside of Kroger or in front of your neighborhood park? It’s because they recognize the importance of coming to the customer. The Girl Scouts do not have shops or stores; rather, cookies are sold seasonally, and quite frankly, nobody keeps track of when Thin Mints are “in season.” Scouts understand that it is not the customer’s job to keep informed about their product; rather, they realize a duty as young entrepreneurs to keep their customer base abreast about what they can “bring to the table.” They bring the cookies to the customer; they are encouraged to offer samples. Whatever it takes to earn and secure a customer, that’s what they aim to do. Ultimately, they operate with the ideal intention of keeping no person in the dark about their product – something all businesses should strive towards. Whether it’s keeping clients up-to-date through the mail, phone calls, or a gentle reminder through a discounted service, businesses are responsible for reminding clients why they are worth it.

Girl Scout customers tend to be a loyal base, buying annually when the chance arises. Of course, repeat purchase practices cannot develop if past customers are not given chances to buy in subsequent years. One frequently undervalued way to thank a customer for their support is to follow-up and ask that they subscribe to your services again. Offer loyalty points and discounts to returning customers, and extend those offers to individuals who have not come back yet. Keep record of services or products needed by individual customers so that you can tailor those benefits accordingly. At the end of the day, every customer is a person, and every person wants to feel remembered.

A contributing factor to the Girl Scouts repeat customers is not just a love for Thin Mints, but a co-existing love for supporting a cause. The Girl Scout organization has transparent goals and principles that it has formed a business model upon, and most community members are willing to support a cause they can understand. Make clear to your customers what your business stands for, be it in the way your employees interact with them or the advertising materials that you send their way. People might not always care about what someone stands for; however, they generally care that they stand for something. Make sure you know what that is, whether it is providing a subliminal sandwich or saving the world.

At the end of the day, children can teach us a lot. Let them!

Bexley Law Firm, LLC
http://www.bexleylawfirm.com

About the Author:  Brittany Robinett is a rising third year law student at the Georgia State University College of Law.

 

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